Switch to Desktop Site
 
 

Credit rating: S&P is not the first to downgrade the US

(Read article summary)
Image

Brendan McDermid / Reuters

(Read caption) A trader watches his screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange August 8, 2011. Panicked selling on heavy volume resulted in the S&P 500's worst day since December 2008, with every stock in the benchmark index ending in negative territory. But, it's not the first time a credit rating agency has downgraded the US.

About these ads

The S&P downgrade of U.S. credit has understandably dominated headlines, but S&P was by no means the first mover. At least three other credit rating agencies had already downgraded the United States.

Egan-Jones was the first Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organization (NRSRO) to downgrade. It lowered the U.S. rating from AAA to AA+ in mid-July. NRSROs are the companies that the SEC officially recognizes as credit rating agencies. They number ten in total, with Fitch, Moody’s, and Standard & Poors the most famous (or, in some circles, infamous).

Weiss Ratings was the first U.S.-based rating agency to rate the U.S. below AAA. It initiated official coverage in April at the equivalent of BBB and lowered to the equivalent of BBB- in mid-July, just one notch above junk. Back in May 2010, Weiss challenged the three major agencies to downgrade the United States, but hadn’t yet rated the U.S. itself. Weiss is not an NRSRO.

And then there’s Dagong, the Chinese rating agency. It initiated coverage with a AA rating in July 2010. It then cut the U.S. to A+ in November and to A last week.

Next

Page:   1   |   2

Share