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Why Arizona's new immigration law makes sense

Given the nearly 6.5 billion non-Americans in the world and the tens of millions of those who would rather live in the United States, limits must be placed on immigration or the nation would be swamped with foreigners.

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People cheer during a concert in protest of Arizona's recently enacted SB1070 immigration enforcement law in Mexico City, Sunday, May 16. A recent poll shows 70 percent of Arizona voters approve of their state's controversial new immigration law.

Miguel Tovar/AP

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Arizona has a good case for its tough new law aimed at shrinking the number of illegal immigrants in the state.

One might not think so, given the uproar. The National Council of La Raza and 19 labor and civil rights groups have organized a boycott to keep meetings and conferences out of Arizona. St. Paul, Minn., and San Francisco have banned official city travel. City councils in Oakland, Calif.; El Paso, Texas; and Boston have all passed resolutions to pull business from the state or ban official travel by city employees. California is also considering a statewide boycott.

Much of the fuss comes from critics who want "open borders rather than sovereign borders," says Mark Krikorian, director of the Center for Immigration Studies, a Washington think tank, urging greater restraints on illegal immigration – and lower legal immigration. But given the nearly 6.5 billion non-Americans in the world and the tens of millions of those who would rather live in the United States, limits must be placed on immigration or the nation would be swamped with foreigners.

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