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Satellite collision highlights space-junk threat

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Reuters quotes Gen. James Cartwright, the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and former head of the Pentagon's space operations, who warns that those with satellites will "have to play a little bit of dodgeball for many tens of years to come" to avoid debris from this collision. General Cartwright says that the good news is that the orbit of this debris will be predictable, eventually; the bad news is that the fragments of the satellites cover a large area.

In the half century since the launch of Sputnik, so-called space junk – including defunct satellites and fragments from exploded ones, spent rocket boosters, engine effluents and coolants, paint flakes, and other small particles, all traveling at about 15,000 miles per hour – has come to surround the earth for thousands of miles in every direction.

NASA’s Orbital Debris Program Office has counted about 17,000 objects larger than 10 centimeters (about 4 inches), and it estimates that there are more than 200,000 particles between one and 10 centimeters. The number of particles smaller than a centimeter (about 3/8ths of an inch) probably exceeds tens of millions. NASA says that debris shields can protect a spacecraft from particles as large as one centimeter.

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