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Vikings spread mouse species to Greenland, Newfoundland, study finds

A genetic study of house mice suggests that the species was spread by Vikings between the eighth and 10th centuries.  

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Mice are good at getting other people to transport them, as this man participating in St. Patrick's Day celebrations in Bucharest, Romania no doubt knows. A new study suggests that Vikings helped spread the house mouse throughout northern Europe, Greenland, and Newfoundland.

Vadim Ghirda/AP

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Between the eighth and 10th centuries, Vikings were exploring and spreading into Greenland, Iceland and Newfoundland. Now, a new study finds that these notoriously fierce people brought with them some fluffy stowaways: house mice.

Vikings appear to have brought the house mice with them when they arrived in Iceland and Greenland, according to a genetic analysis of the tiny rodents. The descendents of these Viking mice can still be found today in Iceland, though the Greenland mice died out and were replaced by their Danish cousins.

"Human settlement history over the last 1,000 years is reflected in the genetic sequence of mouse mitochondrial DNA," said study researcher Eleanor Jones of the University of York and Uppsala University in a statement, referring to DNA found in mitochondria, or the energy-producing centers of cells. "We can match the pattern of human populations to that of the house mice."

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