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Miss USA winner: Erin Brady displays her smarts

Miss USA winner: Erin Brady, the winner of the Miss USA pageant, nailed a question about the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to uphold widespread DNA tests. Brady was a Central Connecticut State University finance major.

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Miss Connecticut Erin Brady is crowned the winner of the Miss USA 2013 pageant by Nana Meriwether, Sunday, June 16, 2013, in Las Vegas.

(AP Photo/Jeff Bottari)

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The country's newest Miss USA is leaving a white collar job behind for the glamour and excitement that goes with her new role — and she can't wait.

Moments after she was crowned at the Planet Hollywood hotel-casino on the Las Vegas Strip Sunday, Connecticut accountant Erin Brady said all she could think about was letting her bosses know she won't be coming in tomorrow. Or ever again.

As her family and fiancee looked on, Brady beat out other beauties from every U.S. state and Washington D.C. to take the title, accepting the crown from outgoing queen Miss Maryland Nana Meriwether.

She wore an orange bikini with a matching halter-top as she strutted to the Jonas Brother's "Pom Poms." Later, she donned a strapless gown with a spangled golden corset and long white train.

In the pageant's final minutes, she answered without hesitation a question about the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to uphold widespread DNA tests.

"If someone is being prosecuted and committed a crime, it should happen. There are so many crimes that if that's one step closer to stopping them, then we should be able to do so," she said.

Miss Utah, meanwhile, apparently stumbled in response to a question about income disparity, providing a rambling, halting answer included an invocation to "create education better."

As Miss USA, she will live in a swanky Manhattan apartment and travel the world raising awareness about breast cancer, but Brady has an additional goal of her own: Helping children cope with the effects of drug and alcohol abuse, which have marked those close to her.

"I grew up in a family influenced by that and I think it's really important to help the children of families that are suffering from those problems," she told The Associated Press.

Her father Francis said he always knew his math-oriented daughter was a glamour girl. She and her sisters used to strut around and pretend they were beauty queens.

Her sister Audrey, 20, said with tears in her eyes that her grandmother, who was watching from home, would orchestrate the pretend shows.

"She'd be like, 'Prance around the pool like Miss America.'"

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