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Will your Internet be cut off by DNS Changer Monday? How to find out.

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"This is an important moment in Internet enforcement," says Alan Paller, director of research for the Sans Institute, a cybersecurity education organization based in Bethesda, Md. "For the first time I can remember government is involved and is telling citizens to protect themselves."

Identifying whether your machine is infected with the DNS Changer malware isn't difficult. Users should click on the DNS Changer Working Group site, then follow instructions. There are also software tools to clean up the problem. But the cleanup isn't a piece of cake, experts say.

One of the things DNS Changer Trojan did beside forcing computers to find the wrong websites on the Internet was to turn off their antivirus updates – and to download to those machines a raft of other malware.

"Unfortunately, most of those that still have infected machines are going to find out the hard way on Monday – they'll be cut off – and have to take their machines to a local computer store to get it cleaned up," says Rod Rasmussen, president of Identity Internet. "The biggest danger for most people isn't going to be the DNS Changer itself, but all the other things that got installed."

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