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Christopher Dorner manifesto: a guide to ex-cop's alleged rampage

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At a Friday morning press conference, San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon said officers were able to follow those tracks for about a half mile before the ground became frozen.

Because of the snowy weather, law enforcement helicopters with thermal-imaging systems can’t be used at the moment. But some 100 officers and FBI agents are using Sno-Cats and military-style armored personnel carriers with wheel chains to search an area that includes many abandoned cabins where Dorner might have sought shelter.

“We’re going to search regardless of the weather,” Sheriff McMahon said as the snow fell heavily around him. “Our primary concern is to make sure people in this community are safe.” As of Friday morning, ski resorts in the area were open but schools remained closed – because of security concerns as well as the weather.

In Los Angeles, meanwhile, police had set up more than 40 security details to protect law-enforcement officials and others threatened in Dorner’s 11-page manifesto.

Dorner’s writings are a reminder of Mr. Kaczynski’s manifesto of 18 years ago; both were linked to killings, and both made bizarre demands. (Kaczynski is serving life imprisonment without parole for killing three people and injuring 23 others in mail bomb attacks.)

But there are major differences in the two documents as well.

Kaczynski’s diatribe was against modern society and technological development that threatened the environment and personal freedoms. He had no apparent intention of publicly acknowledging authorship, and he was tracked to his remote Montana cabin only when his brother recognized the rhetoric in the manifesto and reported it to the FBI.

Kaczynski used the US mail system and newspapers to publicize his beliefs. Dorner used something not available to Kaczynski in 1995 – posting to his Facebook page.

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