Switch to Desktop Site
 
 

Supersonic daredevil skydiver touches down safely

On Sunday, Felix Baumgartner skydived 24 miles, jumping from a pressurized capsule, and landed safely on Earth. It was not immediately certain if he had broken the speed of sound. 

Image

Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria steps out from his trailer during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. on Saturday. On Sunday Baumgartner jumped from an altitude of 128,000 feet, an altitude chosen to enable him to break the speed of sound.

Balazs Gardi/AP

About these ads

Extreme athlete Felix Baumgartner landed safely on Earth after a 24-mile jump from the stratosphere in a dramatic, daring feat that may also have marked the world's first supersonic skydive.

Baumgartner came down in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,000 feet, or 24 miles, above Earth. He lifted his arms in victory shortly after landing, sending off loud cheers from onlookers and friends inside the mission's control center in Roswell, N.M.

It wasn't immediately certain whether he had broken the speed of sound during his free-fall, which was one of the goals of the mission.

Three hours earlier, Baumgartner, known as "Fearless Felix," had taken off in a pressurized capsule carried by a 55-story ultra-thin helium balloon. As he exited his capsule from high above Earth, he flashed a thumbs-up sign, aware that his feat was being shown on a live-stream on the Internet.

During the ensuing jump from more than three times the height of the average cruising altitude for jetliners, Baumgartner was expected to hit a speed of 690 mph.

Any contact with the capsule on his exit could have torn his pressurized suit, a rip that could expose him to a lack of oxygen and temperatures as low as minus-70 degrees. That could have caused lethal bubbles to form in his bodily fluids

Next

Page:   1   |   2   |   3

Share