Switch to Desktop Site
 
 

C. Everett Koop, Reagan's revolutionary surgeon general, dies

When C. Everett Koop finished his 8-year term as surgeon general in 1989, he left behind a landscape where AIDS was a top research and educational priority, smoking was considered a public health hazard, and access to abortion remained largely intact.

Image

Former U.S. Surgeon General Dr. C. Everett Koop, seen here in 2002, raised the profile of the surgeon general by riveting America's attention on the then-emerging disease known as AIDS and by railing against smoking. He has died in New Hampshire at age 96. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)

Jim Cole / AP / File

About these ads

With his striking beard and starched uniform, former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop became one of the most recognizable figures of the Reagan era — and one of the most unexpectedly enduring.

His nomination in 1981 met a wall of opposition from women's groups and liberal politicians, who complained President Ronald Reagan selected Koop, a pediatric surgeon and evangelical Christian from Philadelphia, only because of his conservative views, especially his staunch opposition to abortion.

Soon, though, he was a hero to AIDS activists, who chanted "Koop, Koop" at his appearances but booed other officials. And when he left his post in 1989, he left behind a landscape where AIDS was a top research and educational priority, smoking was considered a public health hazard, and access to abortion remained largely intact.

 

Koop, who turned his once-obscure post into a bully pulpit for seven years during the Reagan and George H.W. Bush administrations and who surprised both ends of the political spectrum by setting aside his conservative personal views on issues such as homosexuality and abortion to keep his focus sharply medical, died Monday at his home in Hanover, N.H. He was 96.

Next

Page 1 of 5

Share