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NRA's Sandy Hook press conference: What can it say?

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Unlike with mass shootings of the recent past – Tucson, Ariz.; Aurora, Colo.; the Sikh temple in Wisconsin – most of the 26 people killed in last Friday’s rampage were young children. Public outrage and anguish are high. In contrast to his past responses, President Obama has pledged to use “whatever power his office holds” to prevent more mass shootings and has acted on that pledge.

On Wednesday, Mr. Obama announced an interagency task force, headed by Vice President Joe Biden and aimed at coming up with proposals by the end of January. On Thursday, Mr. Biden convened a meeting of law-enforcement officials and cabinet members at the White House, and said he sees “no reason why the assault weapons ban” can’t pass Congress.

Given Republicans’ continued control of the House and ability to filibuster legislation in the Senate, that may be easier said than done. But what’s clear is that the slaughter of 20 first-graders and six staff members at Sandy Hook Elementary School has left an indelible impression on Americans like no other recent event. And as the national conversation continues, the 4.3-million-member NRA is in a delicate position.

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