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Kremlin calls in top Russian protest leader for questioning

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On Monday, the State Investigative Committee summoned Udaltsov to appear and explain the accusations made in the film, after receiving a letter from the deputy chairman of the Federation Council, Russia's Kremlin-appointed upper house of parliament, requesting it to do so.

The makers of the documentary film, "Anatomy of a Protest 2," are not named in the credits, but most experts say it was almost certainly made using surveillance footage of Udaltsov gathered by the FSB security service.

The grainy and shadowy film shows someone who resembles Givi Targamadze, chairman of Georgia’s parliamentary committee for defense and security and a close ally of Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili, talking in a smoke-filled room with a usually-obscured profile of someone who looks like Udaltsov. The Mr. Targamadze figure suggests a range of wild schemes, including seizing Russia's Baltic enclave of Kaliningrad, activating Chechen rebels to commit terrorist acts in Moscow, and doing "something" to disrupt Mr. Putin's 60th birthday jubilee (which passed peacefully on Sunday).

More substantially, Targamadze appeared to be offering Udaltsov financing of $50 million for protest activities, which would be contributed by disgraced Russian banker Andrei Borodin and other anti-Putin exiles living in London.

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