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North Korea missile threat? North Korea 'closer' to nuclear threat, says Pentagon

North Korea missile threat: Intelligence agencies disagree on how great a missile threat North Korea poses, despite North Korea's recent threats against South Korea, Japan, and the US.

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A North Korean vehicle carrying a missile drives past a mass military parade in Pyongyang's Kim Il Sung Square to celebrate the centenary of the birth of the late North Korean founder Kim Il Sung, April 2012. North Korea recently threatened to attack the U.S. using "smaller, lighter, and diversified" nuclear-tipped missiles.

David Guttenfelder / AP / File

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North Korea "will move closer" to its announced goal of being able to strike the U.S. with a nuclear-armed missile if it keeps investing in tests of nuclear and missile technology, the Pentagon said Thursday in a report to Congress.

The unclassified version of the report, which was required by a 2012 law, offered no estimate of when North Korea might achieve that capability. It said the pace of progress will depend in part on how many resources are invested.

The report fits an established U.S. intelligence picture of North Korea making an enormous effort to become a nuclear power and of an economically poor country directing a disproportionate amount of resources to its military.

Much about North Korea is a mystery to Western intelligence agencies, including the intentions of its leader, Kim Jong Un, who came to power after his father, Kim Jong Il, died in December 2011. The Pentagon report said the U.S. foresees little change in North Korea's key strategic aims, which it said to include using "coercive diplomacy" to compel acceptance of its security interests, as well as developing a nuclear arsenal and undermining of the U.S.-South Korean alliance.

"We anticipate these strategic goals will be consistent under North Korea's new leader, Kim Jong Un," it said.

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