Menu
 
Switch to Desktop Site

Default object view. Click to create a custom template, Node ID: 1063741, Object ID: 1057321

China’s most Western-leaning university faces a course correction

numbered item

China’s most Western-leaning university faces a course correction

There are no related objects.

As China’s Communist Party insists on party loyalty at universities, will it sacrifice key elements of its economic success: teaching critical thinking and creativity?

In 1981, Chinese universities were in recovery mode: Many had been shuttered during Chairman Mao’s Cultural Revolution, as intellectuals came under suspicion. But Shantou University, founded with the help of one of the richest men in Asia, was just getting started: a blank slate that came to represent the new China – one that strived to be open to the outside world. Eventually, Shantou earned a reputation for Western-style education, from foreign teachers and a flexible curriculum to freedom for critical thinking. But since General Secretary Xi Jinping came to power in 2012, it has become clear that higher education is no exception to his drive for party loyalty – the greatest since the days of Mao Zedong. And Shantou, once a model of education reform, has been hit particularly hard. In September, it didn’t take long for students to notice the campus had changed. Dozens of posters reminded passersby of the virtues of the Communist Party; 12 “core socialist values” were emblazoned in a five-story dormitory. But the highest stakes for the university’s students depend on changes in the classroom.

Karen Norris/Staff

There are no related objects.

There are no related objects.

KeyValue