Menu
Share
Share this story
Close X
 
Switch to Desktop Site

After Mitt Romney's speech, voters may still ask: Can we trust him?

Mitt Romney’s acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention last night was a tepid mix of boilerplate and biography, vague on policy, economical with the truth, and without a memorable, soaring line. It reflected all of the problems that have bedeviled Romney from the outset.

Image

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and vice presidential nominee Rep. Paul Ryan wave following Mr. Romney's speech during the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla. Aug. 30. Op-ed contributor Kurt Shillinger observes: 'Romney’s accomplishments provide plenty of reassuring notes….But along the way he has sown many doubts about his core convictions and principles, and may, if he wins, find himself bound to a plan he could not explain and cannot implement.'

Charlie Neibergall/AP

About these ads

After nearly six years of seeking the Republican presidential nomination, Mitt Romney stood before his party and the nation with one imperative task last night: to make the case that President Barack Obama has failed and present himself as a reliable and necessary alternative.

Put more succinctly, he needed to establish trust.

It started well, with Mr. Romney entering the Republican National Convention hall not from behind the stage curtains but down the aisle as if he were entering a joint session of Congress. A convention without pomp is wasted circumstance, and this was well-crafted political theater. It presented an often awkward candidate as both presidential and metaphorical – a man of the people, chosen by the people, rising up the open steps to the podium from the ranks to lead the people. It was a distinctly American moment.

But the acceptance speech that followed was a tepid mix of boilerplate and biography, by turns heart-warming and quizzical, vague on policy, economical with the truth, and without a distinctly memorable and soaring line. In short, it reflected all of the problems that have bedeviled Romney from the outset. That shortfall is as unfortunate as it is hard to understand, and increases the possibility that as the campaign season moves into its final two months Romney may never quite explain himself.

At a time when the economy is the overriding concern of Americans of every demographic category, Romney touts an impressive resume. He is a more qualified candidate than Barack Obama was four years ago, and his record includes impressive successes in both the private and public sectors. In some of his better lines, he urged voters to separate their emotional ties to Obama and their dashed hopes.

Next

Page 1 of 4


Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

Loading...