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Deep freeze: In northern US, mercury plunges, heating costs rise

The most frigid place is the upper Midwest, where the highest temperatures on Tuesday and Wednesday were forecast to be below zero. The cold front will generate lake-effect snow in the Great Lakes region.

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A man and his dog walk through freshly-fallen snow along Wayne Street in St. Joseph, Mich., Tuesday.

Don Campbell/The Herald-Palladium/AP

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Last winter may have been mild, but now, temperatures are plunging in the Midwest – some 20 to 30 degrees below normal. The arctic blast, which is moving through the Ohio Valley into the Northeast, coincides with a historic increase in home heating costs this winter, particularly in New England.

The deep freeze is expected to last into the weekend.

“The cold air started moving into Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the Great Lakes area over the weekend and was firmly entrenched in those areas before moving into Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York,” says Jim Keeney, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

 

The most frigid place is the upper Midwest, where the highest temperatures on Tuesday and Wednesday were forecast to be below zero. Temperatures toppled most dramatically in upper Minnesota and Michigan: For example, International Falls, Minn., which is located across from Fort Frances, Ontario, is expected to have a low overnight Tuesday nearing 30 degrees below zero. By Tuesday afternoon, temperatures in Duluth, Minn., had already fallen to 20 degrees below zero.

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