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Arctic ice continues to thin, and thin, European satellite reveals

The thickness of the Arctic’s ice was whittled to a new recorded low this winter, according to data from the European Space Agency’s CyroSat mission.

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The Arctic’s ice thinned ever more this past winter, again sounding the alarm bells that Arctic ice melt is continuing unabated.

Brennan Linsley/AP

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The thickness of the Arctic’s ice was whittled to a new winter low, according to data from the European Space Agency’s CryoSat mission. The ice’s volume, less than 15,000 cubic km between March and April, is a new data point in the long chronicle of Arctic ice decline, a process that scientists expect could be catastrophic for the planet.

The news from the ESA comes days after scientists reported that the ice’s decline this summer was less dramatic than the shrinkage during last year’s summer minimum. Rather than marking the resurgence of the Arctic ice, as some British newspapers have erroneously reported, the smaller-than-expected decline in breadth is understood by scientists as a small blip in what is otherwise a long-term ebbing of the ice.

And just as the ice is becoming less extensive, it is also becoming thinner – a trend that scientists point to as the most indicative sign that climate change is taking a toll on the Arctic.

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