Switch to Desktop Site
 
 

Hurricane Alex pushes oil onto Gulf coast beaches

Hurricane Alex has made Gulf coast beaches particularly vulnerable. "With this weather, we lost all the progress we made," says scientist.

Image

This June 30, 2010 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) GOES satelite image shows Hurricane Alex. Alex disrupted the BP oil spill clean-up effort in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday as the storm gathered strength and was expected to make landfall. US President Barack Obama declared a state of emergency in Texas as Alex strengthened into the first Atlantic hurricane of the season late Tuesday.

Newscom

About these ads

Rough seas generated by Hurricane Alex pushed more oil from the massive spill onto Gulf coast beaches as cleanup vessels were sidelined by the far-away storm's ripple effects.

The hurricane was churning coastal waters across the oil-affected region on the Gulf of Mexico. Waves as high as 6 feet (1.8 meters) and winds over 25 mph (40 kph) were forecast through Thursday just offshore from the Mississippi Delta in Louisiana to northwestern Florida.

In Louisiana, the storm pushed an oil patch toward Grand Isle and uninhabited Elmer's Island, dumping tar balls as big as apples on the beach.

"The sad thing is that it's been about three weeks since we had any big oil come in here," marine science technician Michael Malone said. "With this weather, we lost all the progress we made."

The loss of skimmers, combined with gusts driving water into the coast, left beaches especially vulnerable. In Alabama, the normally white sand was streaked with long lines of oil. One swath of beach 40 feet (12 meters) wide was stained brown and mottled with globs of oil matted together.

Dozens of vessels that were being used to combat the oil spill were tied to docks Tuesday as Alex, more than 500 miles (800 kilometers) away, approached the Texas-Mexico coast. Most days, the fleet would have been skimming oil from the Gulf and ferrying workers and supplies. But the hurricane turned many people fighting the 11-week-old spill into spectators. And they will be for days.

Next

Page 1 of 4


Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.

Share

Loading...