Switch to Desktop Site
 
 

Is TV paying too much attention to fans?

Next Previous

Page 2 of 5

About these ads

According to Christopher Buchanan, who served as president of Mr. Whedon's production company, Mutant Enemy, Whedon never let the desires and speculation of the fans influence the direction he wanted to take the show or individual characters.

Whedon sometimes made unpopular choices in his shows, Mr. Buchanan says, but it was a part of what made them so engaging. Whenever it seemed as if characters were in a good relationship, fans would start to get nervous. When Tara was killed off on "Buffy," the reaction was strong, he says. "We got hate mail. I had a guy that would fax me every day a single-spaced full page of ... you don't even want to know ... for six months." But he believes that same sense of unpredictability is what kept the fans on the edge of their seats.

Although fans didn't have a direct influence on the shows themselves, Buchanan acknowledges the role that an active and organized online fan base had in helping get a green light for "Serenity," the cinematic sequel to the shortlived "Firefly" series. Although it wasn't the only factor involved in getting the movie made, he says that it contributed to the decision. "One [factor] was the sales of the DVD sets and that was obviously directly related to fans." He adds that the decision to produce a DVD set of the single season of "Firefly" was also a result of the strong online fan presence.

Next Previous

Page 2 of 5

Share