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Daniel Schorr: An appreciation

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While at NPR, he continued writing for the Monitor. From 1986 to 2007, Schorr wrote 750 opinion columns for the paper. In March 2009, as the Monitor was moving from daily print to an online-first format, Schorr penned his last Monitor piece – a remembrance of being hired by the paper’s legendary foreign editor, Charles Gratke. “He was a great editor of a great newspaper,” Schorr wrote.

Schorr was notable for staying a reporter and commentator his entire career – he never stepped into the revolving door between politics and the press. However in the late 1970s he did accept a brief appointment as Regents Professor of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley while writing a syndicated newspaper column, according to his NPR biography.

Schorr became the story twice in his career. His reports for CBS News about the Nixon administration’s failings enraged the president. And thus during the Watergate hearings in 1973, Schorr found himself on television one night to reveal Nixon’s enemies list. Reading the list on the air for the first time, Schorr was surprised to find his own name at number 17. “I remember that my first thought was that I must go on reading without any pause, or gasp,” Schorr wrote in his 1977 book “clearing the Air.” He won three Emmys for his Watergate coverage.

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