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Republicans back a Republican budget: why that's news

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RSC Chairman Jim Jordan (R) of Ohio said he will back the Ryan busget, though RSC members will also be able to vote for their own, more conservative budget, as well.

For example, where Ryan’s budget proposes $1.028 trillion in discretionary spending – that's $19 billion less than the $1.047 trillion cap set in 2011 debt-limit legislation – the RSC budget cuts discretionary spending back to $931 billion.

In effect, that means that, despite the cuts, the Ryan budget still grows discretionary spending compared with fiscal year 2011 levels, while the RSC’s budget would roll spending back to FY 2008 levels.

“It’s hard to go home to the American people in my district and say, 'Hey, we made some changes here,' and they say ‘Well, I looked at the budget, and it's bigger than it was last year,’” said Rep. Tim Huelskamp (R) of Kansas, who opposes the Ryan plan. “So there’s a real credibility issue if we’re going to follow through on the Ryan budget.”

Tea party sympathizers, rallying around Capitol Hill on Tuesday in opposition to President Obama’s health-care law, agreed that their 2010 revolution has not brought the desired results. In interviews, many said they weren’t seeing enough follow-through on lawmakers' promises like the 2010 Pledge to America, a GOP campaign document that aimed to slash $100 billion from the spending for the balance of FY 2011. Congress managed a $39 billion reduction, mostly by punting spending reductions to future years.

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