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Poland election: Can late president Kaczynski's twin brother pull off an upset?

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A June 16 poll by the state-run Public Opinion Research Center indicated that, in the first round, voters are likely to favor Komorowski over Kaczynski by 47 to 31 percent. But another poll conducted by the TNS OBOP company puts Komorowski's advantage at only 7 percent.

Kaczynski’s right-wing Law and Justice party was ousted from power by the center-right Civic Platform in 2007, after two years of governing in a coalition with two extreme-right and populist parties.

Kaczynski, who was named the party’s candidate after the unexpected death of his brother, has lately been trying to soften his tough rhetoric and woo undecided voters. This strategy, it seems, has been quite successful.

"In my opinion, the Polish society has rebuilt the bond of national unity since the Smolensk tragedy,” Mr. Kaczynski said in an interview for the Rzeczpospolita newspaper. "We have to make good use of this unique chance and make a fresh start.”

Some voters doubt Kaczynski's softer stance

Still, despite the candidate’s shift to a less confrontational tone, some experts argue that many Poles doubt the authenticity of Mr. Kaczynski’s sudden change of heart.

"Memory of Jaroslaw Kaczynski’s government is still fresh in many voters’ minds,” says Roman Benedykciuk, coordinator of the Polish program at the liberal Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Freedom. "In the past, Kaczynski has portrayed himself as a tough and rigid politician, reluctant to compromise both in domestic and international politics.”

Kaczynski’s efforts, aimed at soothing his image, were perhaps best visible in a video message he released in May. The message, addressed to "our Russian friends,” pictured Kaczynski - whom many had regarded as an anti-Russian politician - thanking Russian citizens for "every gesture of compassion and sympathy” they have shown to Poles since the tragedy.

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