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Bucks in foul mood

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The Milwaukee Bucks lost their composure, and then they lost the game. Two flagrant fouls and one technical came back to haunt Milwaukee as the Bucks lost to the Philadelphia 76ers 89-88 Wednesday night in the Eastern Conference finals. "We definitely lost it," Bucks forward Scott Williams said. Milwaukee faces elimination when the two meet in Game 6 tonight. Milwaukee has complained about the officiating: The Bucks have attempted only 77 foul shots to Philadelphia's 134 and have eight technical fouls to one for the Sixers. The winner of the Bucks-76ers series faces the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA finals.

Golf Cart ruling

Gearing up for possible requests for golf carts stemming from Casey Martin's court victory Tuesday, the US Golf Association said Wednesday it will abide by the ruling and handle requests on a case-by-case basis.

Even though Martin's lawsuit was against the PGA Tour, the US Supreme Court decision could have an even greater impact on the USGA, because 30,000 players compete in its 13 championships, 11 of which require walking.

"If a player had the same [medical] condition that Casey had, we would give that person a cart," said USGA executive director David Fay. "Beyond that, it's way too early to say. We're looking at the opinion.... But clearly, it opens things up."

Teenage Mile-stone

A high school senior broke the scholastic record for fastest mile, set more than 35 years ago by Jim Ryun, considered the greatest mile runner in US history. Competing against some of the world's best milers in the Prefontaine Classic on Sunday, Alan Webb, 18, of South Lakes High School in Reston, Va., ran the mile in 3:53.43. The time eclipsed Ryun's scholastic record of 3:55.3 set in 1965.

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Maurice Greene, the world record-holder at 100 meters, embraced Webb after his victory laps. "I wouldn't race him in a mile," Greene said. "He don't look like no high school dude."

(c) Copyright 2001. The Christian Science Monitor