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Biggest loser in South Carolina isn't Santorum. It's evangelical leadership.

Evangelical leaders endorsed Rick Santorum ahead of the South Carolina primary, but evangelical voters didn't listen – pushing Newt Gingrich to victory instead. This departure marks a dramatic shift in the movement – with far-reaching implications for American politics.

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Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum speaks during a night rally Jan. 21 in Charleston, S.C. Evangelical leaders endorsed Mr. Santorum as their candidate of choice ahead of Saturday's primary, but evangelical voters pushed Newt Gingrich to victory instead. This marks a shift in the traditional Christian right "voting bloc" – with broad implications for the movement's future in American politics.

AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt

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Last week, ahead of the South Carolina primary election, 114 evangelical leaders gathered in Texas to determine which GOP presidential candidate they would collectively endorse. The Christian right vanguards voted 85 to 29 to anoint Rick Santorum. As it turns out, their constituency wasn’t listening.

Two-thirds of voters in the South Carolina primary described themselves as Evangelical or born-again Christians according to exit polls. Yet 44 percent of Evangelicals voted for Newt Gingrich while Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum – the chosen evangelical candidate – nabbed 21 percent each.

Turns out that Evangelical heavyweights like former Focus on the Family president James Dobson, Gary Bauer of American Values, Tony Perkins of Family Research Council, and others no longer have the uniform sway over Christian voters en masse. This marks a dramatic shift in the movement – with far-reaching implications for American political contests to come.

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