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Autism, learning disabilities services grow on college campuses

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Meanwhile, other parts of the landscape are also expanding. College disability service offices (whose help is usually free) are also improving. Care centers, often for-profit and unaffiliated with colleges, are popping up near campuses and offering supplementary support. Finally, institutions with a history of serving large numbers of students with learning disabilities are growing, some adding 4-year degrees.

"This is the best time ever for students who learn differently to go to college," said Brent Betit, a co-founder of Landmark College in Vermont, which opened in 1985 with a then-unique focus on such students and now has a range of competitors. Among those Betit mentioned: programs within the University of Arizona and Lynn University in Florida, plus Beacon College, also in Florida, which like Landmark has a comprehensive focus on students with disabilities.

"There are better programs available than at any time in history," Betit said. "I think that's in part because of the entrepreneurial nature of the United States. When there's a need out there, and a business market available, people respond."

But the new players also bring new challenges. Families who would once have struggled to find options struggle to choose among them. Some experts, meanwhile, are concerned about the growth of for-profit providers, sometimes charging $50,000 or more. There are also concerns some enrollment-hungry colleges themselves are starting these high-priced services to attract students with disabilities, but lack the expertise or financial commitment to offer what they truly need.

That's what happened to Saylor, who spent two miserable years at a design and technology-focused school in Flint before learning about EMU's new program from his sister, a student there.

"We were led to believe there was more support than there was" at the previous institution, said his mother, who found herself having to constantly help Tony from afar. Tony says simply: "It was horrible."

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