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Study: Community colleges lack rigor, but incoming students ill prepared

Standards are too low both in high schools and at America's community colleges, if students are to be prepared for the careers they hope to have, says the author of a report on first-year community college requirements.

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Adjunct English professor for J. Sargent Reynolds Community College, J. Gabriel Scala (r.) talks with students on campus in Richmond, Va., April 24. A new study of community colleges finds that the schools ask for little academic rigor, but the students aren't reaching even that low bar.

Steve Helber / AP

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There’s been a lot of talk lately of college- and career-readiness for high-school graduates, but according to a study released Tuesday, what community colleges actually require is less rigorous than we think – and many high school graduates aren’t meeting even those low standards.

What is being taught and emphasized in high school math and English, moreover, is out of alignment with what is needed to succeed in community college, the report concludes.

The study, from the National Center on Education and the Economy (NCEE), set out to look at what is actually required of first-year community college students – the textbooks they use, the work they’re assigned, the tests they’re given, and the grades they receive. By contrast, previous studies of student ability have relied on faculty surveys, which tend to emphasize what teachers wish their students knew.

 

Community colleges enroll nearly half of all college students in America, and are often a gateway both to four-year colleges and to vocational education. Thus, zeroing in on what’s needed for success at community colleges made sense, says Marc Tucker, president of NCEE and an author of the report.

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