Switch to Desktop Site
 
 

Military death toll in Afghanistan reaches 2,000

While the US prepares to withdraw most of its troops from Afghanistan by 2014, the number of military deaths in the country continues to rise. The toll is now at 2,000.

Image

US soldiers attend a ceremony marking the seventh anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, at the US Camp Phoenix in Kabul, Afghanistan in 2008. US military deaths in Afghanistan have surpassed 2,000, a grim reminder that a war which began nearly 11 years ago shows no signs of slowing down despite an American decision to begin the withdrawal of most of its combat forces.

Musadeq Sadeq/AP/File

About these ads

US military deaths in the Afghan war have reached 2,000, a cold reminder of the human cost of an 11-year-old conflict that now garners little public interest at home as the United States prepares to withdraw most of its combat forces by the end of 2014.

The toll has climbed steadily in recent months with a spate of attacks by Afghan army and police — supposed allies — against American and NATO troops. That has raised troubling questions about whether countries in the U.S.-led coalition in Afghanistan will achieve their aim of helping the government in Kabul and its forces stand on their own after most foreign troops depart in little more than two years.

On Sunday, a US official confirmed the latest death, saying that an international service member killed in an apparent insider attack by Afghan forces in the east of the country late Saturday was American. A civilian contractor with NATO and at least two Afghan soldiers also died in the attack, according to a coalition statement and Afghan provincial officials. The U.S. official spoke on condition of anonymity because the nationality of those killed had not been formally released. Names of the dead are usually released after their families or next-of-kin are notified, a process that can take several days. The nationality of the civilian was also not disclosed.

Next

Page 1 of 4

Share