Switch to Desktop Site
 
 

House passes bipartisan tax cut deal, first of Obama administration

Next Previous

Page 2 of 4

About these ads

Democrats did win some important concessions, however. They include billions in new government spending, paid for with borrowed money. Moreover, the deadlines in this tax package set up a new round of tax debates in the heart of a presidential campaign in 2012.

Still, to preside over extending the Bush tax cuts was a bitter stroke for House Democrats, in their last hours in the majority. An unexpected revision of the estate tax to exempt families inheriting up to $10 million – added to the deal at the urging of Senate Republicans – made the vote tougher still.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi credited the measure with helping 155 million Americans with tax cuts across the board. “But in order for the middle class to get that tax cut, the Republicans insist that those who make the top 2 percent in our country, that they get an extra tax cut—adding billions of dollars to the deficit and not creating any jobs,” she said during Thursday’s floor debate.

“To add insult to injury, they have now added this estate tax provision,” she added. “In order for the President to get those terms accepted, the Republicans insisted that $23 billion in benefits go to 6,600 wealthiest families in America—6,600 families holding up tax cuts for 155 million Americans. Is that fair? Pelosi urged her caucus to vote for an amendment to expand the reach of that tax. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell threatened to scuttle the deal if the House altered the package.

Next Previous

Page 2 of 4

Share